Do you think plants and animals share common ancestry?

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Do you think plants and animals share common ancestry?

Unread postby messagefromdrsattler » Tue, 21st Jan 2014 18:52

i took a biology course this past summer and all i really know is that we think it has something to do with our cells both having a nucleus and an energy storing organ

but when you look at it from a macrobiological perspective, it seems very farfetched to think plants, animals, fungi, etc. were once the same organism

personally i have been interested in taking paleontology in college (because I saw jurassic park when I was 5 and my brain hasn't stopped crunching the ideas) BUT i just got cheated on and dumped by my ex fiance and I'm NOT ready for hard college work right now
which is a long way of saying I'm not very educated on this subject
Remember that chap about twenty years ago? I forget his name. Climbed Everest without any oxygen, came down nearly dead. When they asked him, they said why did you go up there to die? He said I didn't, I went up there to live.
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Re: Do you think plants and animals share common ancestry?

Unread postby V-Raptor » Tue, 21st Jan 2014 20:45

The problem with this is that it's really hard to really grasp how much time passes between evolutionary "stand-stones", particularly in a case where the fork happens *really* early on Earth's biological history, so at first thought it may seem unreasonable. Mutations in an organism are really throwing changes at the wall and seeing what sticks, though, and given enough time you start to note divergences in different populations. Have that happen throughout millions and millions and millions of years and, well, you'll get some pretty ridiculous results. Like the platypus. Thing's weird, yo.

I'm far from an expert, though, so here's a paper I found on the subject: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/article ... 097391.pdf
From the abstract:
Wang and others wrote:In the past, molecular clocks have been used to estimate divergence times among animal phyla, but
those time estimates have varied widely (1200^670 million years ago, Ma). In order to obtain time
estimates that are more robust, we have analysed a larger number of genes for divergences among three
well-represented animal phyla, and among plants, animals and fungi. The time estimate for the
chordate^arthropod divergence, using 50 genes, is 99346Ma. Nematodes were found to have diverged
from the lineage leading to arthropods and chordates at 117779Ma. Phylogenetic analyses also show
that a basal position of nematodes has strong support (p499%) and is not the result of rate biases.
The three-way split (relationships unresolved) of plants, animals and fungi was estimated at
157688Ma. By inference, the basal animal phyla (Porifera, Cnidaria, Ctenophora) diverged between
about 1200^1500Ma. This suggests that at least six animal phyla originated deep in the Precambrian,
more than 400 million years earlier than their ¢rst appearance in the fossil record.
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Disclaimer: I haven't played JPOG in years, take any advice with a pinch of salt.
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Re: Do you think plants and animals share common ancestry?

Unread postby messagefromdrsattler » Tue, 21st Jan 2014 23:10

Yeah the problem with the paleological aspect is the further you go back in time, the less hard evidence you have to prove anything.
All the more reason I disapprove of the idea we spawned from some "primordial ooze."

I'd say it's obvious that we do share common ancestry with all other forms of life, given that our cellular structures are essentially the same.

I asked my biology professor what makes the difference between living chemicals (ribonucleic acid) and non-living ones like water. She said "there are emergent properties from the different levels of organization" which I kind of understand...
Remember that chap about twenty years ago? I forget his name. Climbed Everest without any oxygen, came down nearly dead. When they asked him, they said why did you go up there to die? He said I didn't, I went up there to live.
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